Friday, November 14, 2008

Gobekli Tepe: The World's First Temple?

To Schmidt and others, these new findings suggest a novel theory of civilization. Scholars have long believed that only after people learned to farm and live in settled communities did they have the time, organization and resources to construct temples and support complicated social structures. But Schmidt argues it was the other way around: the extensive, coordinated effort to build the monoliths literally laid the groundwork for the development of complex societies.

(Via Futurismic.)

3 comments:

intense said...

"But Schmidt argues it was the other way around: the extensive, coordinated effort to build the monoliths literally laid the groundwork for the development of complex societies."

Yeah, Schmidt's argument would seem to make sense. Gobekli Tepi's stone monuments and carvings predating Stonehenge by 6000 years is also kind of amazing.

Anonymous said...

I enjoy it when our preconceptions are questioned by such marvelous discoveries. Back, back we go, it stimulates our imagination and adds to the body of knowledge concerning origins.

Michael

linus r. said...

Shirley bloged this one.... I commented that this would be a great place for a picnic....

Philip Madoc's dramatic narration of Discovery Channel series "Egypt Uncovered" (I own the complete set) has remnants of the first calendar in the middle of nowhere the Egyptian dessert some 3000 years before the first pyramid.... the stones are still there to this day.... and only the archaeologists know the exact location!! chilling....