Friday, November 21, 2008

I've encountered dozens (if not hundreds) of examples of supposed NASA image tampering. These, if real, are unquestionably the most arresting.

(Thanks: The Keyhoe Report.)

10 comments:

linus r. said...

what the hell is going on here?? I demand an explanation!!

maybe these are silly pranks at the expense of astronomy fans??

maybe a perverse pastime at NASA is "image tampering"??

linus r said...

"maybe these are silly pranks at the expense of astronomy fans??
maybe a perverse pastime at NASA is image tampering??"

with this plausible explanation, this is actually kind of amusing, as long as these "image hackers" keep this to an obscure minimum....

Gareth said...

Compelling, fascinating, and frustrating.

In that order.

Anonymous said...

Yea thats right its just pranks, on a rather large scale that would discredit the integrity of a national institution. Im sure they would allow such 'pranks' to be pervade...

You people seriously need to wake the heck up..

linus r. said...

since when did any government organization including nasa ever have any intregity??

Anonymous said...

As the guy says himself the duplicated rocks appear on the large scale composite panoramic mosaics but not in the smaller source images that these are made from. That immediately says that there is nothing much of interest there - the images have most likely just been touched up when the joins / matches weren't too good.

"You should know that these panorama images are mosaics of multiple small images attached together to form the whole. You should also know that the smaller images producing these particular evidence scenes found here at AS17-147-22552 for the Apollo 17 EVA 1 ALSEP panorama and at AS17-145-22159 for the Apollo 17 Station 5 panorama do not have these rock duplications in them. In other words, the duplications and false data are limited to the wide panorama images and not the source images for these evidence spots."

Anonymous said...

I deal in image manipulation for a living.

If these were just splices of panoramas then you'd have horizontal divisions in the replication. What I'm seeing here is nonsensical, angular replication in very specific areas. Moreover this replication should follow a pattern all the way across the area of splicing and that's not the case here. The duplicate features are placed very specifically in small regions.

Just doesn't make sense. We need more info.

-Denny

Anonymous said...

Yes but if the duplicates aren't there in the original images, who cares? If there's something to hide it will be there in the original images. I didn't suggest that they are artifacts from splicing but more likely they are there to fix some other problem with the image transfer. When was this done?

Read it again:

"You should also know that the smaller images producing these particular evidence scenes found here at AS17-147-22552 for the Apollo 17 EVA 1 ALSEP panorama and at AS17-145-22159 for the Apollo 17 Station 5 panorama do not have these rock duplications in them. In other words, the duplications and false data are limited to the wide panorama images and not the source images for these evidence spots."

It kind of doesn't matter why this has been done, unless there is something of interest in the original photos. Eh?

Anonymous said...

Sure but I still don't understand why they've duplicated features in small target regions which don't follow a splice line all the way through the image. It is a convenient excuse if say they are using the technique to hide things in other images.

I'm just trying to understand the rationale.

-Denny

Anonymous said...

I don't know why I just spent time looking at this but if you look on the lpi site at the panorama picture for that second example it's apparent that quite a large area is 'duplicated'. You can see this in the guy's example as well, other large details besides the one's indicated with yellow arrows reappear. My guess is it's to do with making a rectangular composite from images taken of a 360 deg view from a single point.

Panorama:

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollopanoramas/pans/?pan=JSC2004e20304&zoom=True

Original:

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/frame/?AS17-145-22159